Hypo Like A Rock Star – Hashimoto’s

Hypothyroid Like a Rock Star - Hashimoto's

I love the community gathering on the Hypothyroid Mom Facebook page. One of my readers named Samantha wrote that when her doctor discovered her sky high TSH levels, he responded, “You hypo’d like a rock star!” Now you know I couldn’t get that image out of my mind. A common scenario with Hashimoto’s is one in which the thyroid condition fluctuates between being underactive and overactive. For these Hashimoto’s sufferers, their symptoms fluctuate from hypothyroid to hyperthyroid and back again and forth like a rock star partying hard then crashing with a hangover then partying hard again. Their TSH swings up and down like a rock star gone wild!

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is considered the number one cause of hypothyroidism in the US, yet thyroid antibodies are often NOT tested.

There may be readers here right now reading this article with Hashimoto’s and they have no idea.

Hashimoto’s disease is an autoimmune condition in which the body attacks and destroys its own thyroid gland. Piece by piece your body chews up and destroys your own thyroid gland as if it is the enemy. In a healthy immune system, antibodies act as the body’s army to detect and destroy invaders not normally present in the body, such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. In the case of Hashimoto’s disease, a defective immune system wreaks havoc on the body by directing antibodies against its own thyroid gland as if it is a foreign invader.

Vulnerability To Other Autoimmune Diseases

A Hypothyroid Mom reader left this comment on my Facebook page that was so important it stuck in my mind for months. When you have one autoimmune disease you are more likely to develop others.

Teri Nichols wrote:

After researching in 2009, I asked to be tested for Tg-Ab, TPO-Ab, and TSIG, the 3 thyroid antibodies. All 3 of mine were very high. I also asked for T4 Free, T3 Free. Both of mine were very high. I also asked for these tests (lupus/sjogrens): ANA, ANA Patterns, SSA Antibody and SSB Antibody. My ANA was 1:640, pattern was speckled, and positive for SSA. I was dx with Graves and Hashis, and Sjogrens. Later, I asked for these tests: DQ ALPHA 1, DQ BETA 1, GLIADIN AB, IgA and GLIADIN AB, IgG. All came back positive, which means I have the pair of Celiac genes and gluten sensitive. Research your symptoms, find the possible diseases you may have, research the labwork for those diseases and politely insist your doctor runs the labwork for you. Good Luck

If nothing is done to calm down the autoimmune attack on your thyroid gland, the risks are high that your immune system will then begin attacking other parts of your body. You become vulnerable to develop other autoimmune diseases.

  • Type 1 Diabetes
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Celiac Disease
  • Addison’s Disease
  • Cushing’s Disease
  • Alopecia Areata
  • Sjögren’s Syndrome
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Pernicious Anemia
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
  • Sarcoidosis
  • Scleroderma
  • Vitiligo
  • Psoriasis

Mary Shomon provides an Autoimmune Disease Checklist, a list of symptoms that can point to different possible autoimmune conditions to bring to your doctor’s attention.

Many readers have contacted me suffering from multiple autoimmune diseases in addition to common hypothyroidism symptoms, yet their doctors have NEVER tested their thyroid antibodies.

Refusal To Treat Thyroid Antibodies

Many readers have written to say their thyroid antibodies are sky high but their doctors refuse to treat them because their TSH is “normal”. This is particularly disturbing given that in the early stage of Hashimoto’s TSH can be normal while the immune system continues attacking the thyroid. As well, for Hashimoto’s sufferers who cycle up and down with fluctuating TSH levels, their doctor may happen to test their TSH at the low point in the swings and mistakenly determine TSH is “normal”.

Mary Shomon wrote a great article about preventative thyroid treatment for treating antibodies when TSH is normal.

It’s a controversial subject, and many endocrinologists will simply dismiss you if you ask about it. But new research has been published that supports the understanding that autoimmune Hashimoto’s disease may be preventable, slowed, or even stopped entirely before it progresses to destruction of the thyroid gland and hypothyroidism.

Failure To Address The Autoimmune Condition

Chris Kresser from Medicine For The 21st Century wrote:

The standard care for a Hashimoto’s patient is to simply wait until the immune system has destroyed enough thyroid tissue to classify them as hypothyroid, and then give them thyroid hormone replacement. If they start to exhibit other symptoms commonly associated with their condition, like depression or insulin resistance, they’ll get additional drugs for those problems.

The obvious shortcoming of this approach is that it doesn’t address the underlying cause of the problem, which is the immune system attacking the thyroid gland. And if the underlying cause isn’t addressed, the treatment isn’t going to work very well – or for very long.

Many Hashimoto’s sufferers report that their thyroid drugs are not helping and their dosages keep being increased and increased. While of course there are many possible reasons for this including type of thyroid drug and dosage, there are also many possible underlying issues in an autoimmune condition that may be the issue. Be an advocate for yourself and insist your doctor investigate these factors or find a new thyroid doctor.

  • Gluten intolerance
  • Food allergies
  • Gut issues
  • Adrenal dysfunction
  • Infections
  • Chronic inflammation
  • Blood sugar imbalances
  • Sex hormone imbalances
  • Vitamin D deficiency
  • Selenium deficiency
  • Heavy metal toxicity

Dr. Izabella Wentz wrote an excellent book addressing the underlying triggers for Hashimoto’s and available treatment options. This is a must-read book for every person with Hashimoto’s Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis: Lifestyle Interventions for Finding and Treating the Root Cause.

Natural Desiccated Thyroid for Hashimoto’s

There is controversy over whether natural desiccated thyroid (NDT) is an ideal treatment option for Hashimoto’s. Some suggest that NDTs are derived from pig thyroid which is biologically very similar to the human thyroid gland. The thinking goes that if your immune system is attacking your thyroid gland then adding a drug that closely resembles it would worsen the condition. While the opposing camp says that NDTs are a great option for Hashimoto’s sufferers.

The key is finding a doctor who will explore the thyroid drug options including NDTs to find the treatment that works best for YOU.

Dr. Alan Christianson provides a great description of Hashimoto’s.

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Model and actress Gena Lee Nolin recently posted a link to Hypothyroid Mom 300+ Hypothyroidism Symptoms…Yes REALLY on her Thyroid Sexy Facebook page. In one day, literally  thousands of thyroid sufferers visited my site. Gena Lee Nolin is the first internationally-known celebrity to tackle worldwide thyroid awareness. She has created a media sensation bringing a worldwide spotlight on thyroid awareness. Who knew all those years ago when I watched Gena Lee Nolin on the popular series Baywatch that she would be mentioning me to her fans? It’s amazing how life works out.

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About Dana Trentini

Who knew that little butterfly-shaped thyroid gland at the base of my neck could affect my life so completely? I founded Hypothyroid Mom in memory of the unborn baby I lost to hypothyroidism. Winner of two 2014 WEGO Health Activist Awards: Health Activist Hero & Best In Show Twitter. *Hypothyroid Mom includes Affiliate links. Connect with me on Google+

Comments

  1. I love the links to your videos. I never thought I would sit through an appeal to a working group of the Scottish Parliament. Who knew you could even download these things? The video on this blog post is so very interesting. It’s cool to get a mix of written and visual media. Thank you very much for taking the time to put this together. And by the way thank you about bringing Gena Lee Nolin to my attention. I did not know who she was and her wonderful contribution until I learned about her from your blog – so just so you know she is getting people looking at her website too b/c you mentioned her.

  2. Help please! I’m almost 24yrs old. I have an 18 month old, work 40+ hours a week, and I have Hypothyroidism. I am almost positive it is Hashimotos, my family has a history of it. I am constantly trying to find studies and research on this to condition and can never find anything. I am constantly having extreme symptoms. My mental clarity is horrible. I feel like I can’t function as a normal human being. My P.A. isn’t doing much to help me and it’ll be a while before I can see my actual doctor. Where can I find the research on this so I know what other questions to ask my doctor and to suggest further testing? Any information would be greatly appreciated!!!!! Thank you so much! I love your page too!

  3. is there foos i should not eat with hyperthorodism in othere words is there a det shet for hper and hyprothyroidism if u have these please email me them thanks dana

  4. after geting radiation iadean i seem to be putting on weight head achs r back back pain carpal tunlle symtions all though i had 2 ops one in each hand cant sleep feel exuasted will all these things last to early yet to get bloods done doc said wait a few more weeks like june feel aful had no pains befor treatment and cant stop crying please help

    • Dana Trentini says:

      Wyn, have you spoken with your doctor about your symptoms? After RAI many of my readers suffer from hypothyroidism symptoms. Please speak with your doctor for thyroid testing.

  5. sorry for so many texts i have a goita befor treatment when i get horman replace ment tabs will the swelling go down also started to get sores in my head tiney ones that scab over

  6. “I love the community gathering on the Hypothyroid Mom Facebook page. A few months ago, one of my readers wrote that when her doctor discovered sky high TSH levels, he responded, “You hypo’d like a rock star!” Now you know I couldn’t get that image out of my mind. A common scenario with Hashimoto’s is one in which the thyroid condition fluctuates between being underactive and overactive. For these Hashimoto’s sufferers, their symptoms fluctuate from hypothyroid to hyperthyroid and back again and forth like a rock star partying hard then crashing with a hangover then partying hard again. Their TSH swings up and down like a rock star gone wild!”

    I love this rock star reference. I posted this to my fb page. I have always thought of hashimotos as a roller coaster. I do not like roller coasters. The up and down. Ugh. Can a girl just be on a straight path(no symptoms/good labs) for awhile?!

    • Dana Trentini says:

      Thank you Amy. So sweet! When my reader commented about how she “hypo’d like a rock star” the image stuck in my mind. Love having you here on Hypothyroid Mom!

  7. hi dana feeling better to day got the bloods done on thursday doct told me stop takeing the medication as throid levele came back normal lost one stone feel good have to get the bloods done for my doc in hospital willl be askin for doc to do bloods with reading u gave another daughter got it this last week thats 2 now yougest waiting blood results get back to u soon

    • Dana Trentini says:

      Hi Wyn, Happy you’re feeling better. Be sure to ask for a copy of your lab results to see which tests were done. Often times TSH is the only test done but this one test does not give a complete picture of the problem. At the minimum ask your doctor to test at the minimum Free T4, Free T3, reverse T3, thyroid antibodies, adrenals and iron levels including ferritin.

  8. thank u dana thank u i will do that i have appoint ment to get bloods done for hospital and i will get lab result of this one too thanks again

  9. Dana, thank you for your comments and information to help those of us who are trying to get through difficult health issues. I have been struggling through life for the last 2+ years. I have had basic blood tests for thyroid function which came back normal. I had anti-nuclear antibodies done and they came back 1:640 and speckled patterning. The doctor also checked my blood for signs of Lupus, that was negative. I have problems with tinnitus, palpitations, pain in both groins, knees and heels. I fluctuate between being overly hot or overly cold. I have some hair thinning in the front of my hairline. Get sore throats off and on and sometimes I feel an ache in the front my neck accompanied by a feeling of fullness/swelling. I have weight gain followed by weight loss within a matter of a couple of months. My skin is extremely dry and I have many warty growths and skin tags appearing mainly on my torso and my neck over the last year or two. Alcohol and some food intolerances…….I was taking 100mg/daily of Aspirin for 6months and suddenly reacted badly, I was told I had become allergic to it. This prompted me to go on a Low Salicylate diet which is extremely hard to do as it is very limiting. I was put on an antidepressant but after a couple of months I came off that too because I started reacting badly. I have been told that I am having anxiety issues and I have to relax a bit more. I am going to the doctor tomorrow and I am unsure if I can get through to her that I need her to take my symptoms seriously. Do I ask for a referral to an endocrinologist who may take me more seriously…? I am at a loss as to what to do. I haven’t been to the doctor for 3months as I feel that she thinks I am a hypochondriac. I just want to feel well again…….I am 65 years old (I used to say young, but not any more). Thank you, sorry this is so long winded. Regards Jen.

  10. Hi, I have Hashimotos and am currently on 75mg of Levothyroxine. My problem is i’m still cycling between Hyper and Hypo. I have booked into see another doctor today as my one is worse than useless. What do I say to get him to take my symptoms seriously, is there any tests which you feel I need and should ask for. I have found out so much stuff via the internet and nothing from my doctor. I have asked for times to be referred to an Endo but he just refuses saying it takes time for the medication to make you better. I have recently gone Gluten free as I have heard this can help. Thank you for your time xx

  11. Melissa Pennock says:

    I can’t tell you how happy I am that I have stumbled across this sight. I’ve had so many issues regarding my health and having hypothyroidism but never having the doctors looking further into it in case of other serious issues. Now I’m determined to find a good doctor and get all of the testing done because this disease has taken a toll on my body. Thank you for putting it all together.

  12. LOVE YOUR SITE! THANK U! I am 35 yrs old and have struggled with fatigue & depression since I was a teen. Have struggled with my weight since 2nd grade. I have had my TSH tested MANY times. Always told me it was “normal” so of course I believed the doctors and labs know best. Well, not anymore! The past few yrs my the symptoms have just kept coming….impossible to lose weight, feeling of tight throat like a lump is in it….achy body….depression. The list goes on & on. My docs have told me I have ADD, possibly Bipolar, & Fybro. BTW, my mother has grave disease as well. Most recently I have been feeling like i am swining back n forth from hypo to hyper. My body will ne hot and racing like crazy then i crash and ache all over like i have the flu. Tomorrow I go to a new doc to tell him symptoms and tell him ALL the tests I want him to run. I am scared to death that my test will come back normal. I dont know what to do next. I know there is something bad going on inside of me and I hope I can get the answers i am looking for.

  13. I have been diagnosed with hashimotos, on thyroxitine 100 mg daily, just had blood test and been told I am on too high level so take take only 50 mg on Wednesday and Saturday. I know very little about this disease and am overwhelmed researching it. My concern was that my antibodies were over 1400 and apparently meant to be under 60 ……….. Why is this so and what can I do to prevent my body attacking my thyroid. Would appreciate ur advise :)

  14. Mary Unruh says:

    You left Cowden’s syndrome off your list of thyroid related conditions. I had Hashimoto’s for 20 yrs and then developed papillary thyroid carcinoma (family history of Hashi’s but I was the first to get cancer.) Turns out I have two mutations in my PTEN gene and while I don’t have the typical physical markers for Cowden’s Syndrome I qualified for genetic testing based on other family history issues. It’s important to consider getting tested if you have Hashimoto’s and have a family history of any of the listed conditions or side effects given on the Cleveland Clinic PTEN page. It increases your risk for 6 cancers.

  15. So sorry I am posting in someone else’s thread….I could not figure out how to comment. 3 weeks ago I had a blood test that showed my thyroglobulin antibodies to be elevated and the rest of my panel looked good. My PCP diagnosed me with Hashimoto’s, but the endo he sent me to says that is not the case, bc it would be the peroxidase antibody that would be elevated and not the thyroglobulin. He said it is probably just Postpartum thyroiditis. What are your thoughts???? What should I do?

  16. Hi… I was hoping for some input/advice regarding some labwork I have had.
    In Aug 2012:
    TSH was 1.54 [on a .3-4.5 range (nothing else ordered)]

    In June 2014:
    TSH was 4.73
    Free T4 was 1.0 on the same range scale.

    In Sep 2014:
    TSH was 1.81 (on a .34 to 5.6 range)
    Tot T4 was 6.87 (6 to 12 range)
    T3U was 39.6 (on 32 to 48 range)
    Free T4 was .75 (on a .6 to 1.12 range)
    These were done at a lab where I work, all others were sent to military labs (probably all different).

    In Sep 2014 (less than a week after the values above-also for Sep):
    TSH was 3.51 (.3 to 4.5 range)
    Free T4 was 1.2 (.9 to 1.7)
    Free T3 was 3.3 (2.0 to 4.4)
    TPOab were 9 (on a 0-34 scale).
    He implied that he was going to order TGab, but did not.

    I realize that there is a two year gap in the first two tests, and no T4 or T3 was done in the first, but should the TSH swing back and forth that much? My doctor calls it subclinical hypothyroidism, but doesn’t seem to see any problem with calling it “normal”….

    About 5 years ago, I started noticing the throat discomfort (they called it globus and told me it was anxiety), air hunger (had to take 2 Benadryl and lay down to sleep just to have some relief). This returned any time I was awake. I was told after an endoscopy that I had some mild reflux and prescribed an acid reducing med, had plantar fasciitis, no sex drive, and constant fatigue.

    I often can’t find the words I want to say even though they are in my head, hair falling out constantly to the point that I cut most of it off, was diagnosed with mitral valve prolapse in 2009 when this all started, (my father has just passed away), muscle and joint pain from just getting off the couch after a half hour makes me feel like I am 80 (I am 42), very short and heavy periods, and high blood pressure for about 7 yrs (my youngest child is 14, so not sure if all this started that far back).

    I get the feeling that doctors think we are hypochondriacs, but there is no way I would expect to feel this bad at this age. In addition, I work nights in a hospital and get 72 hours in one week and have the next week off. Most people would think that is a great schedule, but it takes most of my week off to recover so that I can go back to work.

    Thanks for anyone’s input, I appreciate it.

    • all of your levels look normal, I think you may have had a poor diet the past 3 decades and are deteriorating quicker. do you mind giving any personal facts, height/weight/activity level? basically, your body might just be falling apart, repair it.

      • I am 5’9″ and 180 lbs. a little more than I would like, but not as bad as some. My diet is not poor, and my family and I eat lean meats, fresh veggies… If you are envisioning a 5’5″ 250 lb woman, that I am not. I am quite active and my job requires of lot of walking. I have stayed within 5 lbs of my weight since 2000, when I had my last child.

  17. Someone please help. My T-3 and T-4 have been checked and everyone says normal. My TSH was 7.45 recently, now back in normal ranges I went and ordered my own blood work for Anti-TG AB and Thyroglobulin. Didn’t get the TPO test, my mistake. If I had a doctor that remotely cared this could have been avoided. My results are back with ANti-TG normal but the Thyroglobulin was 91. I am scared, I feel so bad have lost over 20 pounds in 3 months. Have bad anxiety, tachycardia then slow heart rate symptoms. Blood pressure is low and I don’t know what to do or who to see. Most want me to wait weeks and I feel hopeless.
    Tracey

  18. have u had ur vitamin D levels checked . many of ur symptoms could be from a D difficiency . it also sounds a lot like hypothyroid. also ur B12 levels. I’ve struggled with all but the joint pain seemed specific to the D levels. I started taking D vitamins and within days noticed a Huge difference . I also take liquid B12 2000 a day.

  19. Can someone tell me if high Thyroglobulin anti bodies of 44 means Hashimotos for sure?

    Also is there always something like yeast at the root of Hashimotos?

    I am at my wits end with symptoms. I keep throwing money at these doctor that claim they can help but usually do not. I am onlt eating meat, veggies, and fruit.

    T3, FREE 2.6
    THYROXINE, FREE, DIRECT 1.0
    TSH 1.5

    Also on my Lupus panel the C3C and C4 were both low but all else fine. Anyone know what this means. Sorry doctor wont even discuss.

    So appreciated!

Trackbacks

  1. […] ended up in a mental hospital and was misdiagnosed Bipolar. A year later, she was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, an autoimmune thyroid disease that can cause symptoms of both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. […]

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