Saving Babies On World Thyroid Day

Saving Babies on World Thyroid Day

What happened to my baby?

I wailed. [Read more…]

Are Cholesterol Medications Zapping Your Thyroid? A Cardiologist Explains

Are cholesterol medications zapping your thyroid? A cardiologist explains

This cardiologist professes pharmaceuticals for heart disease are rarely necessary and most heart procedures are dangerous and usually unnecessary, but always financially rewarding to the doctor. He treats heart disease with natural approaches including dietary changes, toxin reduction, and natural supplements. Hmm… [Read more…]

Cook your way to thyroid balance

Cook your way to thyroid balance

Hormone expert and chef Magdalena Wszelaki uses everyday food to help women with hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s, Graves’ disease, menopause, adrenal fatigue, PCOS and estrogen dominance (fibroids, endometriosis, fibrocystic breasts) find their hormonal balance, naturally. I gave Magdalena a tough request.

“Give me 10 of your favorite recipes that support the immune system and improve thyroid health, but they MUST taste great.”

And she delivered.

[You may be wondering how to print out the recipes in this article for your collection or any material at Hypothyroid Mom. Go to the article you wish to print, then select File then Print or type command P. This will open a printing window where you select your settings and print.]

[Read more…]

5 reasons conventional doctors can’t fix your thyroid

5 reasons doctors can't fix your thyroid

Why did I create Hypothyroid Mom?

I have spent countless hours over the last 5 years pouring over published studies on hypothyroidism. I have scoured the Internet every day searching for the very best thyroid experts and doctors. I have answered email after email and social media comments and posts from people struggling with hypothyroidism at all hours of the day and night. I have devoted my life to this blog that I created called Hypothyroid Mom. And you may wonder. Why?

Rage.

Yes I said rage.

On a cold, snowy day in New York City on January 20, 2009, I lay on a medical exam table on what would be one of the worst days of my life. I had miscarried at 12 weeks and was being prepared for a D&C, a surgical procedure to remove my baby. A technician had just taken an ultrasound and walked out of the room to reconfirm to the medical staff that my fetus had no heartbeat. I sprang off my bed and ran to the image on the screen. I felt my body shake and my fists clench as I stared at the image of my unborn child. From a place deep in my soul came a wail, “What happened to my child?”

I had unnecessarily lost my unborn baby all because my doctors had not read the Endocrine Society guidelines for pregnancy. Yes. Seriously. A TSH of less than 2.5 in the first trimester was clearly stated in the 2007 guidelines and mine was close to a whopping 10.0 with raging symptoms.

Why had I trusted my conventional doctors to have the answers?

Why had I not done my own research and been my own advocate?

Why had I not told my doctors to go to hell when they insisted that my symptoms were all in my head?

I should have fought like a ferocious lion for my child.

And I have to live with that regret for the rest of my life.

I will tell others.

I promised myself as I lay on that medical exam table.

I will let the world know.

I promised.

And Hypothyroid Mom was born.

I was determined to get to the bottom of this. I wouldn’t rest until I got myself well again and all my Hypothyroid Mom followers with me.

I searched high and low for thyroid experts when I first created Hypothyroid Mom in 2012. At that time there weren’t as many health experts and doctors writing about thyroid as there are today. I had to really search for the best information and I struck gold when I landed on this man.

Chris Kresser.

I hope he knows how many people he has helped. Including me.

I recently had a chance to connect with Chris and ask him some of my lingering thyroid questions. I know there is much written about thyroid but I wanted to dig deep into some of the issues that are not usually covered. [Read more…]

First recorded accounts of the clinical features of adult hypothyroidism, 1873

First recorded account of clinical features of adult hypothyroidism 1873

Queen Victoria (1819-1901)

Queen Victoria’s court physician Sir William Withey Gull is credited as the first person to record the clinical features of hypothyroidism in adults in his 1873 seminal paper.[1] [Read more…]