The Truth About Hypothyroidism And Depression

The Truth About Hypothyroidism And Postpartum Depression

May 25th is World Thyroid Day. I dreamed of a site where hypothyroidism sufferers from across the globe could come together, empower themselves with knowledge, and take charge of their thyroid health. In 7 months since its launch in October 2012, Hypothyroid Mom has 194,162 monthly pageviews with 61,413 monthly unique visitors from 165 countries in the world. Thanks to all of you, Hypothyroid Mom is even better than I dreamed.

I was contacted by a reader with a story that drove straight to my soul. Her story hit me so hard that I sat motionless with my head down on my desk. If you’ve ever questioned the seriousness of hypothyroidism, that ends today right now with this post.

I had my first child at 27 and all was well. Within 3 months I was back to my normal size. Life was wonderful and I was a wonderful mother.

I have always been a fun loving person who loved to laugh. Having such a great child, I wanted another one. It took me 9 months before I became pregnant with my 2nd child. Immediately I started getting sick. Sick as in I was always hungry. If I didn’t eat immediately upon waking I would get sick. I rapidly began packing on pounds and was extremely tired and moody. I had a short fuse at all times. At 8 weeks I started bleeding and had a miscarriage. After losing the baby I could not lose the weight I had gained. I was 29 and the doc said that our metabolism slows down as we get older. Diets didn’t help.

I became pregnant with my son within 3 months of miscarrying. Started off the same. I was sick if I didn’t eat. I slept all day and was extremely tired. My 3-yr old daughter who I couldn’t get enough of spent my whole pregnancy watching TV while mommy slept. Again I was extremely cranky. My hair began falling out and I was extremely hot and would often wake up covered in sweat. I was out of breath all the time. I gained over 75lbs. By the end I couldn’t walk. Just lifting my leg caused pain. I asked the doc to check my thyroid and he said it was a normal pregnancy issue.

After he was born I had extreme postpartum depression. To the point that less than 1 hour after my son’s birth I kept envisioning myself picking him up and throwing him up against the wall. My son had colic and cried all the time. I suffered from extreme exhaustion and lack of sleep. My only way of dealing with it was to cuss him out. I wanted to hurt him but would never let myself.

After my 6 week check up I found another doc. I begged her to check my thyroid. She did and my TSH came back at 100.

The Truth About Antidepressants

The Dr. Oz Show recently aired a show called The Truth About Antidepressants.

The Dr. Oz Show conducted their own survey online and found that “72% of women who were prescribed an antidepressant did NOT receive ANY other medical workup by the doctor first. This is critical because often times medical conditions will mimic depression and we know that when you properly diagnose and treat that underlying medical problem the depression will go away. Doctors may sometimes misdiagnose women with depression if you really have”:

ANEMIA

PCOS

CELIAC DISEASE

LOW THYROID

PMS

Before anyone starts taking an antidepressant, they should have complete medical workup done to determine if underlying medical issues including low thyroid are the cause of the depression. The problem is that there is so little awareness about thyroid conditions. There are millions of undiagnosed thyroid sufferers worldwide. How many of them have been misdiagnosed with depression? I hope this article reaches them.

Hypothyroidism & Depression

I have received countless messages from hypothyroid women on antidepressants. You only need one look at my posts When Thyroid Disease Masquerades As Psychiatric Disorder and Mental Disorder or Undiagnosed Hypothyroidism to know there is compelling research linking hypothyroidism to mental health symptoms.

If you are hypothyroid and on antidepressants, what should you do?

Please speak with your doctor about taking a closer look at your thyroid condition. Be sure that thyroid testing includes at a minimum TSH, Free T4, Free T3, Reverse T3 and thyroid antibodies. Do you suffer from other hypothyroidism symptoms? Are you certain you are being optimally treated for your thyroid condition? Be sure to also speak with your doctor about anemia, Celiac Disease, PCOS and PMS as Dr. Oz recommends.

It is particularly interesting to me that in addition to low thyroid function, Dr. Oz listed anemia, PCOS, Celiac Disease and PMS as potential underlying medical conditions for depression.

  • Anemia – Abnormal iron levels are a common problem for hypothyroidism sufferers so be sure to have a full iron panel including ferritin included in testing for anemia.
  • PCOS - An adrenal problem can cause symptoms much like PCOS so be sure to have your adrenals tested too. Adrenal issues are another common problem for hypothyroidism sufferers. The best way to test adrenals is by saliva testing.
  • Celiac Disease - Celiac Disease and PCOS have been linked to autoimmune thyroid disease so be sure to have your thyroid antibodies tested in addition to testing specifically for PCOS and Celiac Disease.
  • PMS – PMS is a real issue for hypothyroid women. Sex hormone levels are intricately connected to thyroid hormones. Be sure to have your sex hormones including testosterone tested.

Do not just stop taking your antidepressants. Please speak with your doctor and if you decide to stop the antidepressants be sure to have close medical supervision during that weaning off phase.

This is not to suggest that antidepressants are not necessary and helpful for many people. The issue is that every person suffering from depression should have complete medical workup including thyroid testing to ensure all potential medical conditions that mimic depression have been fully investigated.

My fear is that there are many more hypothyroidism sufferers misdiagnosed with depression than anyone realizes.

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About Dana Trentini

Who knew that little butterfly-shaped thyroid gland at the base of my neck could affect my life so completely? I founded Hypothyroid Mom in memory of the unborn baby I lost to hypothyroidism. Winner of two 2014 WEGO Health Activist Awards: Health Activist Hero & Best In Show Twitter. *Hypothyroid Mom includes Affiliate links. Connect with me on Google+

Comments

  1. This issue is close to my heart. I lost six years of my life at the hand of misdiagnosis. After years of being labelled as bi polar and being bedridden and trying a plethora of anti- psychotic drugs a move of house meant a new doctorbwho did some simple blood tests which uncovered hashimotos disease. I had gained 6 stone and developed agoraphobia and was suicidal. Then after not recovering on T4 alone I was sent to an endocrinologist who uncovered insulin resistance and PCOS. This saved my life and I no longer take any mental health drugs. I know had I not had my real health issues discovered I would not be here today.

    • Dana Trentini says:

      Libby, Thank you very much for sharing your story. There will be readers on this page who will read your message and feel they are not alone. So happy you are well now. I love hearing success stories. You should read this post attached about a woman misdiagnosed with bipolar.

      http://hypothyroidmom.com/when-thyroid-disease-masquerades-as-psychiatric-disorder/

      • It’s not just women who are affected. 31 yr old male. Driven crazy with lethargy, big weight gain and massive depression. First suggestion was anti depressants. Refused to take them, then second dr suggested thyroid. I was sceptical – but it was. Score of over 88. Have now lost 1.5stone, more active and more confident. Still struggling as lost a lot of confidence but will get better. But just important to note that happens to us guys too

        • Dana Trentini says:

          Hi Rob,

          Thank you so much for commenting. Absolutely boys and men can develop thyroid conditions. My brother has hypothyroidism too and I watch my sons very carefully for signs. I can’t imagine what it was like for you to have a TSH of 88. So happy you are on the way to feeling better.

          • Maite Roman says:

            I have hypothyroidism and hashimoto diseas. I noticed alot of changes. First I started with vitiligo in my hands. Then I started gaing weight. The lost of hair is extraordinary. I also fight alot, my husband says that I am bi polar, because sometimes I am laughing and then crying. When my son was 11 years old I noticed that even thou he was swimming and playing volleyball he kept gaining weight. So I went to his pedriatician and ask her to do the some blood test. His been drinking syntroid 100 since then. He has alot of mood swings, sometimes he dosen’t concentrated at school.

      • i am 52 year old woman, i live in the eastend of london, i have thyroid for about 7 years, start of on 25 levothyoxine with in in 6mt it want up to 125 and i was fine on that for 6 years, on till last week my doctor took bloods and told me to drop to 100 why would this happen after all these years?

        • Donna K says:

          When reading the dosing for levo or synthroid, it says women under 50 should take 1.7 mcg per kilo and over 50 should take 1 mcg per kilo. Not sure, but maybe that is why yours was lowered?

    • OMG I lost 7 years of my life. I can so relate. I was so angry the day I landed in the hospital thinking I was having a heart attack. Only to find I had 2 large thyroid nodules and was told I was serverly hypothyroid. This is after fighting with my family doctor just to test me for it. He refused. He said he was the doctor and he knew what was wrong with me. You know I dumped him. Got another.

      • Teresa Nevins says:

        Anita,

        I lost several years of my life too. I still have to continue to fight with doctors to stay on a dose high enough to survive. I am beginning to think that when folks are grossly misdiagnosed or under treated, this is when nodules form or maybe even the cause of some thyroid cancers, perhaps? I remember going to the best endo in town, har dee har har har. Idiot, just said that I was starting to develop some kind of muscle disease because my levels were normal. @@%&** I had other idiot endos too. Do I sound bitter? Yes siree Bob.

      • Dana Trentini says:

        Anita,

        I’m so upset what happened to you. So happy you dumped your doctor. I hope all my readers know that if they are suffering symptoms and their doctor isn’t listening to them then it’s time find a new doctor.

        • I was born with an inactive thyroid, the doctors told my parents that if they wanted more children, to consider adopting, but left little hope of me surviving. I was born in Germany while my father was stationed over there. Thirteen days after my birth, dad received his papers to be sent back to the states, the doctors didn’t want to let me go. You see, they had put my mom on a strict no- salt diet. She didn’t even know she was pregnant with me until she began showing. To this day, my doctors won’t refer me to an endocrinologist, and I can’t afford to go on my own, yet. When I do, I hope that I still have this site as a link for adept Endocrinologists, rather than doctors playing God with MY life. I’ve had ‘bumps’ form on my thyroid from time to time, but they’ve gone away after a few days of meditation, and holding God’s Healing Light in that area, no illness, and tests never showing residual abnormalities. I know it doesn’t work for everyone, but it did work for me. Still planning on getting a Full work-up done at the first opportunity. The mood-swings were INTENSE, and I had gone into peri- menopause when I was 26 yrs. young, another bout of intense mood- swings with a good deal of hot- flashes moved me to have my Dr. test me for Menopause…I was. They prescribed Premarin…I told them that I was NOT taking ‘medication’ with pregnant horse’s pee in it, and told THEM that I was actually taking an Herbal supplement that had Black Cohosh in it, along with Don Quai, among others. It’s REALLY helping. Thank you, and keep up the good work.

    • Maureen A Flaherty says:

      Oh my goodness. Every time I read a post, it gives me strength to go on. This is all new to me, as I just posted on another post of yours. Only on 50mcg of levo, for almost 2 mths…the one that said “Unlike the rest of you, I sleep 24/7!!! I too am insulin resistant…did not know this had ANYTHING to do with my thyroid. They never said anything like that. I also have many thyroid nodules, which, I haven’t seen anyone mention. I just had 6 of them biopsied, long needle, and not to painful either…and they came back, nor normal, but, not malignant. I don’t know what that means!!! I also have thyroid antibodies that my allergist told me about. I have a condition called, angioedema…it is massive swelling like hives in my mouth, throat, lips, and once eyes. I take Allegra in the morning, and two Zyrtec at night. If I have an attack, then on prednisone and have my Epi-pen ready. I am so scared and don’t understand any of this. Does anyone else have nodules, thyroid antibodies, etc. No one I know have ever heard of these thing…….Thank you so much.

  2. I have been Hashimotos for at least 22 years. I have been taking thyroid medicine for one month. I have had Beta Blockers age 20, anti depressants age 33 and 40. I have been told I am clinically depressed, but never referred to a pysch professional, I am overweight , but no-one sends me to a dietician. I have been given pain meds and sleeping meds. I have gained 80lbs all told. I have constant pain and sleep apnea. I recently fired my Dr of 8 years after he point blank refused to check my thyroud. My rheumatologist (the one I had to see for Fibromyalgia! Told me she thought I had an RA type disease and gave me plaquenil. Thank god for my Pulmonary Specialist. He finally agreed to try desiccated thyroid. In just one month I can think a lot clearer and my skin is less lizaresque. I am having to pay $350 to see an OBGYN at TrueBalance, but I can deal with that as he was the first person ever to offer a FULL screening.
    I think I am on my way, but half of my life has been plauged with illness, confusion and ignorance.
    I could go on, but I know most of you reading this din’t need to read another repeat if your own misery.
    I only hope this despicable excuse for healthcare resolves sooner rather than later.

    • Dana Trentini says:

      Karen,

      Thank you for sharing your story. For readers who are struggling they will read your comment and know there is light at the end of the tunnel!

  3. Low Thyroidism runs in my family. My mother, sister and grandmother, ect had it. Some also suffer from goiters on their thyroids. I have asked to be tested several times and the results always come back normal, but I too suffer from many of the symptoms. I am thankful I have seen this post because I now know what test to ask for specifically. Thank you so very much.

    • Dana Trentini says:

      Dara,

      With a family history of thyroid conditions like yours, push push push for more extensive testing. Thyroid advocate Janie Bowthorpe includes a list of recommended lab work.

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/recommended-labwork/

      Many people go undiagnosed because one test TSH is the only test done. Here is an article on this topic.

      http://hypothyroidmom.com/top-5-reasons-doctors-fail-to-diagnose-hypothyroidism/

    • Kristin says:

      Dana is right. Keep pushing! Find a doctor who will not just take the tests at face value. It took me over 8 years to get a correct diagnosis. Even when I had goiters growing regularly, I couldn’t get anyone to help. It has taken me 15 to finally get the right dosage and finally all of my healthy eating is paying off. I’m losing weight again. I’m off anti-depressants, too.

      At one point I finally gave up on my ‘specialists’ and asked my regular doctor for a referral to a surgeon to take the problem side out so I would be able to breath and eat normally and I had my left lobe removed (cancerous). The surgeon is the only person who would listen to my pleading that something more than just goiters was wrong. The biopsies and bloodwork showed nothing! I still can’t convince my endo to remove the other side, but I’m working on it!!!

      Just keep trying!

      • Dana Trentini says:

        Kristin, So happy you pushed for help Kristin. It’s about being an advocate for ourselves and insisting when we don’t feel right that all the possible factors are tested.

      • Dana Trentini says:

        Kristin,

        I love your perseverance going through 15 doctors to find one who was listening to you and helped you be well. Bravo!

  4. My story begins very familiar to one I have read. After the birth of my first child 25 yrs ago I had problems having another child. 4 yrs later I gave birth to my son. I became almost non existant, with feelings of being “run down” feeling like “death would become me”. The family doctor checked my TSH and NORMAL. Was sent to a internal specialist who told me 7 months after my child was born I was postpartumly depressed. With an antidepressant I was supposed to get better. I got worse. Developed phobias, anxiety attacks, 12lb weight gain in 5 weeks, cold all the time(to the point I lived in a hot tub), constant aches and pains, to the point I was sent to a rheumatologist as my ANA antibodies and lymyphocytes were off the map. My family doctor suspected Lupus or Rheumatoid Arthritis as my ANA antibody levels were 1:100 (meaning one out of every 100 cells in my body were self destructing) I went to the Rheumatoligist she asked me about my fibromyalgia symptoms and I answered many questions thinking she has known me my whole life !! She did a more “intense panel” of thyroid testing including TSH, T4, T3, free T3, free T4 and thyroid antibodies. The results came back within a short time. I had hasimotos thyroiditis. At that stage I was laughing and hysterical to think I would be able to take one pill a day to make me better! I was actually happy to know all my hypochodriatic symptoms as the internist called them were for real. I began my journey from the age of 27 to now on Synthroid, Elextroxin, then within the last two years I begged my family doctor to check my T3 after a visit to outpatients which revealed that my thyroid meds needed and increase to 200mcg. My T3 was non existant! I was put on synthetic T4 and T3 replacement. Symptoms still existed somedays worse than others. Finally I convinced my doctor to try dessicated thyroid a natural form of replacement. Well the excuses were unreal but she opted to please me as a desperate patient and prescribed it. It hasn’t even been a week and I am out of bed at 7 in the morning thinking of what I can do, no aches and pains, head feels like there is no brick sitting on it, and I have lost 1.8lbs in three days ! My skin is no longer looking like orange peel, and my digestion and blood pressure are resuming to optimal levels. There are a lot of different changes going on in my body all at once and I sense that. I can now see there is a light at the end of the tunnel and it’s not the end it’s like a rebirth … sad that all those years were wasted with poor quality of life and health !! Hopefully this story will inspire you all to aim for your own health and do what you need to to get the results you deserve !!

    • I just read your story Wanda and it has definitely inspired me… More so than the other ones I’ve read. My children are 12,11 and 18months and since having my youngest my Dr. prescribed me an antidepressant and I refuse to take it because I know I’m not depressed and I know something else is going on. I feel a lot of the things you have described and I also have been checked for Lupus seeing as how it runs in my family along with RA. I have had my thyroid checked several times but never like what the advice given here says to do. Thank you all for sharing…

      • Dana Trentini says:

        Dara,

        When your instincts tell you something is not right push for a closer look. Go back to your doctor and say you feel there is something wrong with your body and you want further testing including the testing included in this article. Best of luck.

    • Dana Trentini says:

      Wanda,

      Thank you for sharing your inspiring story!! So love this. I am happy you found what works for you.

  5. Diane Gallagher says:

    Hello everyone I have read all the above comments and feel both deeply saddened but not surprised. I have suffered from hypothyroidism now for 18 years and been taking Levothyroxine. I have recently had full bloods for thyroid, TSH, free T4 and T3 and Antibodies. Ferritin, Iron, etc etc all the tests you can imagine. All normal, and when you look at them I should be a walking picture of health, only if that were true!. I am plagued with aches and pains (having a cat scan next week), etremely tired, cold, weight gain, but the biggest pain of all is depression. I cannot get T3, doctor says tests are all normal, waiting to see yet another Endo, what will he say the same. Desperate this is a debilitating disease and I hear so many testimonies from lots of individuals. Good luck ladies, we need that looking star to shine over us…..

    • Dana Trentini says:

      Hi Diane,

      Get a copy of your lab results and to the right of each score will be the normal reference ranges. Check where your scores fall relative to the ranges. The normal ranges are very broad so it’s important to be sure you are in the optimal ranges. Internationally-known thyroid advocate Mary Shomon wrote: “More innovative doctors are beginning to believe that a TSH of around 1 – 2 — in the low end of the normal range — is optimal for most people to feel well and avoid having hypothyroid or hyperthyroid symptoms. Similarly, some practitioners feel that optimal hypothyroidism treatment includes Free T4 in the top half of the normal range, and Free T3 in the top 25th percentil of the normal range.”

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/hypothyroidism/a/notwell.htm

  6. Feeling very frustrated right now… I went to see my Doctor yet again to ask her to please check my Thyroids and she would not do the test that you all said was best to have done she said since my TSH came back at 2.202 that there was no reason to look any further into it… But yet almost every female on my mother’s side of the family has Thyroid disease and I have a lot of symptoms. I don’t understand what harm it would have done to check into it.

  7. And also if any of you here are from the New Orleans area can you please direct me to a Dr. who will take me seriously and do the further testing I am asking for?…

  8. Delaine Krager says:

    I just received a call from my PHCP not an hour ago. This is the 3rd time I’ve gotten this call from 3 different doctors. Loo was told my levels are “on the low side”. Upon follow up, that blood work showed I was in an “acceptable range but still low.” I’ve found I have MANY symptoms on the list. So unfortunately I get to treat the symptoms while my “anxiety/depression”, “raised cholesterol, “weight gain”, “hair loss”, “increased BP”, ” heavier cycles”, fatigue” get worse. I’m a massage therapist. I’m average in fitness and enjoy yoga and lap swimming. I’m 44 tomorrow and am not excited to get another call like this. I’m also not excited about taking another medication. Is there anything else I can do besides pharmaceutical help?

  9. Hypo Help! I just found you online. I am wondering if you could read this short blog post and let me know if you have any advice.

    http://hoerterfamily.blogspot.com/2013/06/hypothyroidism.html

    I am so confused. The nurse never really told me anything else on the phone. I feel like I should go and see a specialized doctor to talk about this more, but they made it seem like it wasn’t a big deal.

  10. joyce manz says:

    after reading some of these post i realize that i have been dealing with thyroid diease almost all my life i’m 52 basically housebound,it takes such an effort now a days just to either get dressed or take a shower.i constantly hurt all over everyday that i wake up.i weigh at last count 416 lbs. i have been diaganosed with hashimoto diease and do have nodules on my thyroid and a small goiter. i have a family history of thyroid cancer and thyroid diease on both sides of my family maternal and paternal.i have so mush symptoms its just to much to list. and i still can’t get a doctor to agree everything stems from my thyroid. i take 25mg of levoxthyrine which is generic for synthroid what a joke why bother taking it it’s not doing anything for me i still have all my symptoms.i had a endo tell me to stop reading all i have read on the thyroid on the internet and to stop eating my thyroid does not make me gain weight really, this is suppose to a well respected endo doctor in his field where i live and thats what kind of help i got from him my new doctor did a few tests and said i was ok and he did not want to up my meds i think if they upped them i would feel better instead i’m a 52 year old trapped in my house cause i can’t get anyone to listen to me. i should be enjoying my life now instead i’m on disability and i hate my life. the stories i have read on hear just mimics what has happened to me. like the one of the woman who had her child and started wanting to hurt that child, i had the same thoughts 34 yrs ago when i had my daughter and back then i had a doctor prescribe me antidepressant pills. sorry this is so long but i happened to find this site and i needed to get things off my chest.

  11. NewMom-Rayne says:

    Thanks for this site.

    I have only had a hypothyroidism diagnosis for the last (almost) 2 years now.

    To make a very long story short, my PCOS diagnosis came 2 years before my hypothroidism diagnosis, and with it the news I would never become a mother. With miscarriage odds being 99-1 if I did conceive.

    3 months after receiving treatment (Synthroid) daily, I became pregnant the first time. I did miscarry at 7 weeks, but was able to get pregnant again within the 3 months following the miscarriage. I now have a healthy, happy 4 month baby boy.

    My diagnosis was actually a fluke. My levels for thyroid always came back normal when they were checked after other family members received their diagnosis. Finally a doctor didn’t like the feel of my thyroid in my neck, ran a blood test and since it was on the line between “normal” and “not normal”, he wanted to start me on the lowest dose of synthroid.

    My husband and I fully believe had that doctor not taken a chance and just classified me as having “normal” levels instead, our son would not be here right now.

    That doctor moved on and I was unable to ever let him know what a positive difference he made in my life. I will always be thankful to that doctor for not taking things at “face value.”

    As much as I wouldn’t wish hypothyroidism on anyone, it is nice to know there is a site like this so I don’t have to feel so alone in my journey. Thank you.

    • Dana Trentini says:

      “New-Mom Rayne”,

      Your son is a miracle. If your doctor hadn’t looked beyond the lab numbers you may have never been diagnosed. So wonderful to hear of great doctors. There are wonderful doctors and they are worth search for! Love Love Love hearing success stories.

  12. Hello
    I had some hypothyroid symptoms that I was unable to fix with glandular’s. I was wondering if anyone else has had this problem?
    I had identified a low body temperature as a problem, and then set about fixing it. I successfully reset my temperature three years ago. Many of my hypothyroid symptoms have disappeared. I no longer need meds.
    Best wishes
    Janey Hood

    • Dana Trentini says:

      Hi Janey,

      It’s important your doctor do full thyroid testing. Even on natural desiccated thyroid we can have symptoms if our levels are not optimal. For example, thyroid advocate Mary Shomon wrote: “More innovative doctors are beginning to believe that a TSH of around 1 – 2 — in the low end of the normal range — is optimal for most people to feel well and avoid having hypothyroid or hyperthyroid symptoms. Similarly, some practitioners feel that optimal hypothyroidism treatment includes Free T4 in the top half of the normal range, and Free T3 in the top 25th percentil of the normal range.” Personally I take a natural desiccated thyroid called Nature-throid and I still have symptoms if my Free T3 levels are low in the range. I only feel well when my Free T3 reaches the top quarter of the normal range.

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/hypothyroidism/a/notwell.htm

  13. I just received my test results yesterday. My TSH level is 1.51 ulL/mL, my free T4 is 1.12 ng/dL and my T3 is low at 80 ng/dL. I guess I lucked out because the Endo I went to ordered the T3 test just because I asked for it, I guess most don’t unless the TSH comes back abnormal? He also prescribed 15mg of Armour Thyroid as I requested. It helps to do your homework. I went in with a list of symptoms, always feeling cold, depression, thinning 1/3 of eyebrows, fatigue, low blood pressure (it has always been around 90/60) foggy thinking, brittle nails, erratic menstrual cycles and the clincher a swollen tongue. I never even realized my tongue was swollen until I was researching hypothyroidism and I seen a picture of a tongue with grooves on the side of it, then I looked at mine and was like OMG. But the main reason I started researching it is the chronic depression and anxiety I have had since my 20′s. I will be 40 in a week. I have been on Zoloft and that has helped, but I always thought there has to be more to it. I just started the Armour yesterday and I already feel hopeful, I have a bit of a headache tho, don’t know if that is a side effect or something else. Plus depression and low thyroid run in my family; my mom and aunt both have it. I really hope this helps.

    • Dana Trentini says:

      Jill,

      Congratulations! My hope with Hypothyroid Mom was to encourage readers to be advocates for themselves and get the right tests and ensure their doctor explores the drug options until you find what works for you. Bravo!!! How are you doing now on Armour? We’re all different in terms of how we each react to the different fillers/binding agents in the different brands. In case Armour isn’t working for you, there are other options for natural desiccated thyroid. Personally I don’t do well on Armour but feel great on Nature-throid. Then there are many readers here who love Armour, then others say they don’t do well on NDTs and prefer a combination of synthetic T4 and T3. There is no one magic drug for us all. However I applaud you for ensuring your doctor tries the options. Don’t settle until you feel well.

  14. Hi! JUST came accross all sorts of info and this awesome blog full of information.

    At my last OB checkup a couple weeks ago, I told my doctor that I’ve been feeling quite down and exhuasted and achy all the time. I’m short tempered with my husband, etc.
    I thought for sure it was probably postpartum depression… and my baby girl is 7 months now.
    Just got a call that my bloodwork came back with my TPO at 45 when it should be below 35. So I’m going in 2 weeks for more bloodwork – Thyroid panel.
    Not sure what all this means yet, and I guess I have to wait to see how this next bloodwork test goes.
    But I’m starting to think that this is the cause of my fatigue, depression and even more hairloss than normal (like handfuls when I shampoo my hair!)

    Anyways, so glad I found you. This is all so extremely new to me.

  15. Nicole Zieman says:

    Hello Dana,

    I feel alone and lost. Any advice you can give will be greatly appreciated. I am 29 years old. I have been sick since at least 12 years old. I have been diagnosed with several conditions very young. IBS, hernia, cysts on ovaries, chest and spine, severe menstruated symptoms, depression, anxiety, cluster migraines, fibromyalgia. I am in pain and exhausted every single day. thrn bad spells that last 6 weeks where inwear sunglasses and it hurts to talk. been on tons of mediactions, none of which help me. I’m a working, single mom of two young boys. I can barley get through life doing the necessary things to be a good mom and survive. I don’t have health insurance and been to so many doctors, including natural ones. My mom was diagnosed w hoshimotos disease and so was most of her sisters. I am ordering my labs online then taking them to a doctor to diagnose me. Not sure which doctor yet. Any advice on what doctor I could see near Michigan? I live in southern Michigan. Also other than the sex hormones, antibodies, free t3 and t4, what should I get drawn? My vitamin d and b are low. TSH is normal, first draw of antibodies was at level 10 and I was very sick in a rough spell where my throat swells etc. I need help. Thanku

  16. While I’ve recently realized that I need to revisit the medication I take for depression, this article has really made me realize that I’m not pushing hard enough on my hypothyroidism. While I feel I’ve done pretty well and my numbers look good, I’ve still felt miserable (which I”ve attributed to depression alone) and deal with two auto-immune diseases that no one can do anything about. I’m going to go back to my doctor and ask for a more extensive blood work up. Reading this story and the comments make me feel very fortunate, but I have had some dark days and really want to get to the bottom of this. I hope that I don’t have to take a handful of pills for depression forever.

  17. These kind of stories just make me so sad. My problems started around 17 years, mainly with fatigue and muscle pain – 3yrs after giving birth to my daughter. Before then, I was very fit and healthy and slept very well. Fast forward 8years (after gaining a lot of weight, getting reflux, hair falling out, bad fatigue) when I wanted to have another baby and I had 4 miscarriages in row. I had no idea about thyroids really back then and just thought it was my own fault for gaining so much weight. I did end up having a baby and found my health just went downhill even further. I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia in 2009, hyperparathyroidism in 2011 and finally this year hypothyroidism. Until I started researching for myself and joining groups on Facebook etc – I had no idea about how important your thyroid is and how hard it is to get proper treatment!

    • Dana Trentini says:

      Gladys,

      I had no idea how low thyroid could devastate my life either. I am very sorry to hear about your 4 miscarriages. I worry how many thyroid women out there are losing their babies. You can’t imagine how many readers have contacted me about chronic pain and fibromyalgia, so many that I spent days researching for my recent article.

      http://hypothyroidmom.com/thyroid-hormone-the-most-overlooked-treatment-for-fibromyalgia/

      • I wish I had known what I know now, back then. I had a feeling it was my thyroid. I didn’t have the internet or Dr Google back then, but I did have this medical book that had an A-Z on illnesses and symptoms. My symptoms always led me back to Hypothyroidism and yet doctors kept telling me that my thyroid was fine – so I was confused and felt like a hypochondriac for reading medical books all the time looking for mystery illnesses! What the books didn’t mention and what I have learned since then, was that doctors only do the TSH test and if that is normal look no further. I found a test from when I was pregnant 9yrs ago with a normal TSH and a very low FT4. The obstetrician had been old school and run the FT4 as well – even though my TSH was 1.42. He had told me that my thyroid function was a bit low and that I would need to keep an eye on it after the birth of my baby or that I could end up with PND. But of course my TSH was fine and that was all that was ever tested until I discovered the internet and started researching for myself. In the last 5 years I have been diagnosed with Fibromyalgia, Hyperparathyroidism, Hypothyroidism and recently Ankylosing Spontilitis. I am glad I finally know what is causing all this pain and fatigue but I am also sad that it has taken so long. I try and tell everyone I know so that they might second guess doctors instead of themselves and maybe even ask for more indepth testing – trust their inner voices and not feel as if they lazy or just getting old. Honestly only about 10% of people will listen though – most look at you as if you have no idea what you are talking about! I am happy to say that I have helped 2 friends so far though :)

        • Dana Trentini says:

          Gladys,

          Thank you for sharing your story. Your message to “trust their inner voices” is so powerful for me. I did not listen to my inner voice when my hypothyroidism symptoms were so bad during my pregnancy and I miscarried. If there is one message to share follow your instincts. You know yourself better than anyone. If something doesn’t feel right, it isn’t right and push even if it means seeing 20 different doctors until you find someone who helps. Happy to have you at Hypothyroid Mom :)

  18. Hi Dana,
    I suffered from hypothyroidism during and after my first pregnancy. I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism when my little one was 8 months9and what difficult 8 months they had been!!!). As soon as I got pregnant this time I knew it by the change in my moods, low energy and irritability. The specialist I saw insists the thyroid couldn’t cause all these symptoms since my thyroid is presently under control(with the help of medication, of course). I was referred to a psychologist who diagnosed me with mild prenatal depression…This is very confusing as I am not sure what the truth is…

    • Dana Trentini says:

      Hi congratulations on your pregnancy. Please be sure your thyroid has been optimally treated in pregnancy. Absolutely there is a link between hypothyroidism and mental health symptoms. Every cell of the body requires thyroid hormone for proper functioning including the brain. It may be your thyroid is not optimally treated for pregnancy. I learned the hard way that doctors don’t all know the guidelines for pregnancy for thyroid patients.

      http://hypothyroidmom.com/miscarriage-in-new-york-city-be-thyroid-aware/

      Bring a copy of the American Thyroid Association guidelines for pregnancy to your doctor. Be sure your TSH is within range for pregnancy.

      RECOMMENDATION 2

      If trimester-specific reference ranges for TSH are not available in the laboratory, the following reference ranges are recommended: first trimester, 0.1–2.5 mIU/L; second trimester, 0.2–3.0 mIU/L; third trimester, 0.3–3.0 mIU/L. Level I-USPSTF

      RECOMMENDATION 14

      There exists great interindividual variability regarding the increased amount of T4 (or LT4) necessary to maintain a normal TSH throughout pregnancy, with some women requiring only 10%–20% increased dosing, while others may require as much as an 80% increase.

      ■ RECOMMENDATION 16

      In pregnant patients with treated hypothyroidism, maternal serum TSH should be monitored approximately every 4 weeks during the first half of pregnancy because further LT4 dose adjustments are often required. Level B-USPSTF

      ■ RECOMMENDATION 17

      In pregnant patients with treated hypothyroidism, maternal TSH should be checked at least once between 26 and 32 weeks gestation. Level I-USPSTF

      http://thyroidguidelines.net/pregnancy/results

  19. Hypothyroidism is one of the most common causes of depression, but it is often overlooked. At our Naturopathic Clinic – http://www.drmorsillo.com, we make sure to include a thyroid panel when assessing patients with depression. This is a very common issue today, affecting too many people.

    • Dana Trentini says:

      Hi Dr. Morsillo,

      Thank you for commenting on my blog post. I am passionate about this particular topic. I would love to know what treatment methods have you found effective in treating hypothyroid patients with depression. Are there particular tests they should have done? Particular dietary changes, treatments?

  20. Teresa Nevins says:

    I was put on 75 mg of synthyroid in 1995 which helped for a month and then symptoms came back. Idiot doctor couldn’t figure out I needed a higher dose. So then constant misery for 14 more years (economically ruined as I couldn’t work) until I did my own research and found a doctor through thyroid.com’s list of open-minded doctors. At last I could work again and feel human. It was short lived though as I had Group Health and the doctor left Group Health without notifying me and without a referral for a knowledgable doctor. Next doctor refused to allow me to stay on higher dose. She wouldn’t listen to me and then she left Group Health several months later without telling me. Great care huh? Well I found a naturopathic who would work with me, but wasn’t covered by my insurance. Then my husband’s new job offered an insurance that did cover it. Great, only the next year they changed back to Group Health. Now my visits are not covered again. I have a second doctor I like a great deal, but she has been unwilling to do thyroid monitoring because what it comes down to is: In order for me to feel decent I need to be in the upper half of T4 and T3 normal levels which is okay except this brings my TSH level down to just below 0. So this means a constant battle with most any MD to keep on a life preserving dosage if I should ever lose my naturopathic doctor. There has got to be something we can do to stop this terrible care we are receiving from doctors that are under the thumb our egocentric medical system. What can we do?

  21. I have such a similar story. After having this baby I had dreamed of having, all I could do was scream, throw things, yell… behaviors that are not like me at all. And I wanted to hurt him. I’ve never said that out loud. Or written it.
    I went to counselors, chiropractors and doctors for things ranging from depression and rage, to headaches and weight gain that wouldn’t come off – nothing was working. I went on one last desperate attempt to get stronger antidepressants and this new doctor wanted to check my thyroid. What’s my thyroid?
    I was at 110. I’m still not back to normal, but I’m a whole lot better. This disease is NO JOKE.

    • Dana Trentini says:

      Kerri,

      This disease is absolutely no joke. I am sorry what you went through. Thank God you had your thyroid checked. At a TSH of 110 you were severely hypothyroid. It’s so upsetting what this disease can do to us. I fear there are others in the world in the same boat but no one is testing their thyroid and I worry what will happen to them.

  22. I have been diagnosed with hipothyroidis just 2 days ago. For two months I have suffered from edema in my body especially around my eyes and hands. I thought it was because of lithium I am using for a long time, since I had been diagnosed for Biolar Type II 4 years ago.

    I am from Istanbul, Turkey. I have suffered so much from this mental illness. I have lost my academic career, couldnt write my Master’s Degree dissertation, and quitted with a very high GPA score.

    Now, I am back to the roots.

  23. I have celiac disease, but I didn’t know this until two years ago. Before that, everyone that I was lazy or depressed… I was put on antidepressants as a teenager and now I wish I would have never taken them. Once I fixed my diet and ate the right food, the negative effects from celiac wore off and I started feeling great. So I definitely see what you’re saying and it’s horrible that doctors will prescribe antidepressants so easily.

    • Dana Trentini says:

      Hi Daveman,

      I just came over to your blog rawforestfoodsblog.com. I love when fellow bloggers comment on my site. Thank you. I just followed you on Twitter. It is incredible how gluten can wreak havoc on our health including our brain health especially for Celiac Disease sufferers. You should read this new book by Dr. Datis Kharrazian. You’ll find it very interesting:

      Why Isn’t My Brain Working?

  24. I just discovered your site. How wonderful, I’ve been frustrated recently looking for a platform where thyroid issues were discussed, but everything I came across was years old. I think that depression might be the most silent and worst of all the thyroid symptoms. It is not tangible or measurable like (for example) my weight gain. My mirror tells me that I am getting better/worse. No such thing exists for the mind. My main issue since I developed a slow thyroid has been my weight. It has been an uphill battle, one that I seem to have finally learned to accept/understand. What saddens and intrigues me is depression and weight loss. Personally I have gained 100lbs in 10 yrs and this year I decided to dedicate it to figuring this out. Since march I have lost 56 lbs (with the help of a “team”- family/friends/professionals) I still have 44 to go but now I am confident I will get there it is just a matter of slow and steady. I have of course researched hypothyrodism since I was diagnosed and was aware of the depression tendencies. Many times over the years I had to mentally stop and remind myself that I was probably feeling crappy bc of the thyroid and it was causing depression. It was not until I lost about 30 lbs that I realized how bad it had been (mentally). I am pretty strong willed and I get frustrated/annoyed whenever I hear people say that the weight loss will only be reached when you want it bad enough or you think you are good enough (or similar I am #1 party line) it annoys me because I know how I felt…and I can only imagine how others feel…well if I waited until I thought I was “good enough” “worth it” or whatever I would probably be even fatter now. The reality is that you feel crappy, what level of crappy depends on the individual. There is no “self motivation”, “self control” or anything remotely needing any level of “oomph”! The best thing I did was force everyone around me to accept that I have no will power, no desire, no anything. I needed help getting better bc if left alone I can not do it. I needed someone to babysit me and hold my hand. Even THAT moment was not brought on because I wanted to do so etching for “me”. Rather I found out I was going to be an aunt and to be blunt I did not want to be the “motherly/grandma” like aunt (the other 2 aunts are hot) or worse be so fat that I couldn’t do things with my niece. Moral of the story: get help- in the form of friends and family

    • Dana Trentini says:

      Hi Angela thank you for sharing your story. Your advice is so powerful. It’s sad to me the number of readers on my Hypothyroid Mom Facebook page who share that they don’t have support of family and friends. This is a difficult disease and we need support. I have no doubt you will be the “amazing” aunt your niece will love so much.

  25. Scott Jenkins says:

    Hi, I’ve I’m 32 and have bee on and off antidepressants all my life. I have been “diagnosed ” with severe generalized anxiety disorder with elements of agoraphobia. In the summer of this year I stopped taking my antidepressants completely. It took me several months to achieve this by slowly reducing the dose week by week.I had some of the worst withdrawal symptoms of my life. My doctors don’t know that I have stopped my medication because I believe that they (the doctors) are doing more harm than good.
    It has been several months now since I stopped these antidepressants completely, but I still feel rubbish.
    Every day I feel as if I haven’t got the energy to even get out of bed, I feel weak for no apparent reason. I get irritated by the slightest of things. I am very moody. Recently, I have developed pulsatile tinnitus in my left ear (I can hear my blood flow frequently) and now, this week I have started to feel what I can only describe as a choking sensation in my neck ( inside/behind my Adams apple ) along with a frequent dry mouth. I also feel that my eyesight has gotten worse.
    A few Google searches have lead me to hyperthyroidism and apparently pulsitile tinnitus is sometimes a symptom of this.
    Has anyone else experienced these symptoms, and can anyone suggest what I should do, because I have no faith in my Doctors anymore.
    Thanks for listening, and sorry if I have been rambling for too long, I find it really difficult to put my thoughts into words.

    • Dana Trentini says:

      Hi Scott,

      I’m sorry to hear all you’ve been through. It’s important to find a good doctor that’s half the battle. It’s particularly important since you’ve been having these symptoms since stopping the medication you should be seen by a doctor in case there is a connection. Also a good doctor is important to properly test your thyroid in case that is the underlying cause of your mental health symptoms. Testing should include Free T4, Free T3, Reverse T3, thyroid antibodies for Graves and Hashimoto’s. Here are resources to help you locate a doctor to properly test your thyroid function.

      http://hypothyroidmom.com/top-10-resources-to-find-a-great-thyroid-doctor-in-2013/

  26. I have recently read Kaplan book on Hypothyroid which says that it may lead to depression/mood disorders . Which took me by surprise.

    I would like to know if there any renowned author publication which says that Hypothyroid is not the cause of depression or mood disorders. If available than do let me know.

  27. Reading these stories are making me feel better. I have been struggling with depression lately but I have never been a depressed person. I have no idea if thyroid could be the problem. I had it checked and while I have been so depressed I have been thinking about skipping the doctor, reading these have made me think about going to the appointment.

  28. If someone close to you has recently died or you can’t be with loved ones, realize that it’s normal to feel sadness and grief. It’s OK to take time to cry or express your feelings. You can’t force yourself to be happy just because it’s the holiday season.

  29. catherine says:

    Hi All I can say is thank God for the NHS Scotland.Family docs here will routinely check for thyroid problems.I was borderline hypothyroid for about 10years and once I tipped into hypo proper the Dr.tested and started me on meds asap.I am still dragging myself about but much better than before.Good luck folks.

  30. catherine says:

    The computer has just told me the post i may looked like I had made a statement like that before.Thank u captcha for reminding me how slow my brain is with this hypo stuff and i cannot even find the comments lol :-)

  31. Jayne Gale says:

    After I refused antidepressants I talked to a wise counsellor. He said what’s going on? I said I cry and feel bad about myself. He said, what exactly is the process? So I give an example… I see mess on the floor and I know I should pick it up but I have no energy to pick it up so I feel like a bad housewife and mother and I cry. He said, what so the no energy comes first. That’s a normal reaction to a physical problem, its not a mental problem. It took a long time to find the Hashimoto’s but I clung to that like a lifeline – there is something physically wrong with me and I have to find the answer. I hope that is as helpful to others as it was to me

  32. I have been diganosed with depression, insomnia and pmdd. Each and everytime i go to the dr they just want to feel my throat and send me on my way just resently my aunt yold me aboth her being dignosed with hypothyroidism. Here i am looking at the symptoms and I have almost all of them. I had a miscarrage at 5vweeks to have a dnc to find out 11 weeks later it was multiples and i was still.pregnant. my daughter is now 4 since i had her it has been a snowball. Keep telling the dr something is wrong!!!! Been on every type of antidepressants that help.just a little bit. I have 1-2 cycles per month extreamly heavy, chronic fatigue to the point ppl call me lazy I. No sex drive to the point my husband is determined i am having an affair. Extreamly angry all the time. Not a care in the world if the house is a mess i just sit and look at it thinking i need to do something but i just cant. Was put on cymbalta and gained 15 lbs now of course i am depressed. I know my body is not right and i have to find the reason!!! Thank you all for yalls stories it is definitely a huge help to others.

  33. I was misdiagnosed bi-polar for a decade. I was on so many medications that I’m sure it’s why my system needed such an intense detox to start feeling well. I just stopped taking my last anti-depressant in November 2013 (under proper medical supervision) and what a feeling of freedom. There were other things that helped me but I don’t want someone upset I’m promoting a product on this page. I finally am the closest to being well I have been in 15 years and I’m 35 years old.

  34. Hi,

    i was on google seaching for anything that can help me. the search said “Hypothyroidism and depression”. i guess i have reached a point that i dont know what to do. i cant find a proper endo here and neither can i afford one. i have lost hope. i have been diagnosed as a hypo but nothing is working anymore….im lost….

  35. Egg Lady says:

    I have Hashimoto’s…. it has been a rough 11months…. been hypo for 8 yrs on synthroid and antidepressants (which helped some)… but “crashed” 11months ago… a struggle to get doctor to check antibodies, t3 and t4- always feel like I am having to convince them of my symptoms and relation to the thyroid. Finally convinced doc to let me try dessicated thyroid (Erfa)….started this end of November 2013, which has helped some… on December 16 (2013) my my tsh was 0.02, t4 18.2, t3 11.1- this was on 120mg erfa so he lowered me to 90mg… current(feb.13) blood work shows t3 @5.2, t4 @11.6 & tsh @ <0.01 and I do have antibodies @ 205. Seeing a natural doctor who has got me on vit.D, selenium, B100, magnesium…. still having mental health symptoms (anxiety, depression, fear, etc.)…. I would like to have a saliva cortisol test for my adrenals…. not sure whether I should increase my dose of erfa (natural doctor wants to leave it where it is for now, but I read you should be in upper end normal)…. not sure what to do- weepy all the time anxious and depressed, little energy… symptoms that have improved are nausea, insomnia, heart rate too high and palps (still some issues with this though), the worst is the mental health though- any thoughts any one? I can relate to so many of you…. I just want to feel better!

    • Dana Trentini says:

      Hi Egg Lady, We’re all different in terms of what are optimal ranges for each of us. I personally feel my best when my Free T3 is top quarter of the normal range. Each lab uses different units of measurement so check the reference range listed normally to the right of your scores on your lab results. Here in this article I show how to calculate that top quarter:

      http://hypothyroidmom.com/the-thyroid-worlds-queen-t3/

      Thyroid health is a big puzzle with many pieces that should be checked including adrenals, sex hormones, blood sugar, and nutrient deficiencies including D3, B12, magnesium, iron/ferritin, zinc and selenium. With Hashimoto’s there is a strong link with gluten. I have many readers with Hashimoto’s have have gone gluten free to find their symptoms have improved and for some their antibodies reduced to normal. So worth a try. Here are great resources to help you try:

      http://hypothyroidmom.com/weight-loss-tips-for-hypothyroid-moms/

      Whenever in doubt about your thyroid treatment, get a second medical opinion.

      http://hypothyroidmom.com/top-10-resources-to-find-a-great-thyroid-doctor-in-2013/

      • Egg Lady says:

        Thanks…. I was so glad to find this site. I have been on gluten free for about 3 months (strict). I have been using Ativan 1mg sl every other day to take the edge off (however I would rather not have to use this). I have recently started a dose of vit.B5 1000mg per day (divided dose), and vit. C up to about 4000mg per day. Good news is I just recently found a doctor who is happy to check my sex hormones and adrenals (however in Canada we don’t seem to have the 24hr saliva cortisal test- it is a saliva test but only one swab between 11pm & 12am- so that is the only time in 24 hrs that it measures- I hope it shows something, otherwise I may have to order from the states). I want to encourage you all who are struggling like me- keep hanging on and keep searching for answers. And thank you Dana for all you do! God Bless!

  36. I am 20 years old and was diagnosed with hyperthyroid at the age of 14. I went to the doctor because i was dealing with extreme depression. The first thing they looked at were my thyroid levels. I underwent radiation and now i am hypothyroid and take a high dose of levothyroxine and anti depressants. Im glad they caught it when they did. Thyroid problems run on both sides of my family. The thing is im still depressed and feel worthless a lot. i feel trapped by my thyroid problems. Depression has followed my since i was a child. I thought as i got older it would get better. Its good to know im not alone with this problem. Thanks thyroid mom for the awareness of this evil disease.

  37. Nancy hanus says:

    this story is same fact to fact of what happened to me word to word exactly the same thing happened to me. Weight gain miscarriage post partum and thyroid. This makes me really sad that my thyroid was never checked during my pregnancy

  38. Thank you for writing about this!!! This is how I know my thyroid is off – I develop really bad, clinical depression & anxiety. It’s awful. These symptoms came back so I immediately went in for blood work. For a while my PCP was the one checking my thyroid levels & everything was coming back in range, so they kept me at my level & I started on anti-depressants, but even those didn’t help a lot. They took the edge off but that’s it. It wasn’t until I went to a psychiatrist that did a FULL med work up on me, and she told me that even though my numbers were in “range”. They were still off going on the new research out there, so she told me to educate myself by reading Thyroid Solution and she gave me the number to a God send of an endocrinologist. After working with the endo for about 6 months to a year – we had to play with dosages with synthroid, cytomel (T3), vit B12, vit D, and stopped birth control. At that point, my anti-depressant was able to be halved! I’m about two and half years out and weaning off all anti-depressants thanks to these doctors! I have my life back:-)!! I will never trust my PCP or gyno with my thyroid treatment again. Lesson learned the hard way. I still get nervous to come completely off my anti-depressant because I think – what if my levels drop again?! But I have to trust that I’m better educated, I have better support now, and I now know how to ask for help – it’s nerve wracking & exciting.

  39. I am 27. I have been suffering from headaches, fatigue, hair loss, forgetfulness, dizziness, Irritable and I’m cold all the time. I went a couple years with these symtoms and every month it seemed to get worse. I went to the doctors in my town and they gave me blood tests and every time they would tell i had something different wrong with me. They would give me medicine and then have me stop taking it and start taking something different every time I had a blood test done. Finally, I went to an Endo out of town and they told me within one minute of the doctor being in my room that I had a goiter. He did blood work and to me I had I thyroid problem. I have been taking the Levo 50mcg for about 6 months now. When I went back on my three month follow-up they told me my levels were normal now and that they were going to leave me on the 50mcg and check me again in a year. My symptoms have not gone away, I actually feel that they are getting worse. My memory has really gotten bad, just the other day I forgot my daughter was in the car! Thank GOD that is was only for 30 seconds then I realized I had forgot her. But I kept beating my self up. How could I forget I had a child in the car? I used to wonder when I would see someone on TV that forgot their child in a car and I was like how could anyone do that? and now I know. I cried and cried and I still tear up every time I think about it. What if I would not have remembered in those 30 seconds. What could have happened. Is it possible that there could be something else wrong with me or does it take a year for the medication to start to help(I wouldn’t think it would). I called the doctor and he told me that these are not symptoms of a Thyroid problem and I should go see a family physician. The physicians in this town don’t know anything and say that nothing is wrong. Obivously there is something wrong or I wouldn’t have all these symptoms. Anyone have any advise?

    • Mia,

      I am wondering if you need some T3 along with the T4 to fully recover? I needed it and it made a big difference in how I feel. TN

  40. Dana Trentini says:

    Thank you to Watch List News for including my press release “Thyroid Advocacy Blog HypothyroidMom.com Raises Awareness on October 10th for World Mental Health Day”.

    http://www.watchlistnews.com/2013/10/10/thyroid-advocacy-blog-hypothyroidmom-com-raises-awareness-on-october-10th-for-world-mental-health-day/

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